We would like to draw your attention to recent academic publications related to CLIL.

  • Lasagabaster, D. & A. Doiz (eds.). (2016). CLIL experiences in secondary and tertiary education: in search of good practices. Bern: Peter Lang.
  • Nikula, T., & Moore, P. (2016). Exploring translanguaging in CLIL. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 1-13.
  • Nikula, T., Dafouz, E, Moore, P., & Smith, U. (Eds.) (2016). Conceptualising Integration in CLIL and Multilingual Education. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.
  • Rumlich, D. (2016). Evaluating bilingual education in Germany: CLIL students’ general English proficiency, EFL self-concept and interest. Frankfurt am Main: Lang.

More information:

Lasagabaster, D. & A. Doiz (eds.). (2016). CLIL experiences in secondary and tertiary education: in search of good practices. Bern: Peter Lang.

  • A range of researchers rise to the challenge of providing deeper understanding and interpretations of key issues in ways which enable readers to adapt the approaches and ideas to inform their own practices. The nature of integration underpins each chapter and each study in creative, relevant ways at different levels. Bringing together educationalists, linguists and subject specialists provides a shared context for surfacing deeply held beliefs and providing clearer pathways for closer understanding and adaptations to define, refine and support integrated learning.

Nikula, T., & Moore, P. (2016). Exploring translanguaging in CLIL. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 1-13.

  • After reviewing the concepts of Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) and Translanguaging, this article presents an exploratory study of translanguaging in CLIL contexts. Employing illustrative extracts from a collection of CLIL classroom recordings in Austria, Finland and Spain, this article argues that both pedagogic and interpersonal motivations can influence language choices. The authors suggest that the L1 should be appreciated as a potentially valuable tool in bilingual learning situations and that there is a need for increased awareness-raising around this question. You can find the article: here.

Nikula, T., Dafouz, E, Moore, P., & Smith, U. (Eds.) (2016). Conceptualising Integration in CLIL and Multilingual Education. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

  • While CLIL research has often addressed learning outcomes, this volume focuses on how integration can be conceptualized and investigated. Using different theoretical and methodological approaches, ranging from socionconstructivist learning theories to systematic functional linguistics, the book explores three intersecting perspectives on integration concerning curriculum and pedagogic planning, participant perceptions and classroom practices. The ensuing multidimensionality highlights that in the inherent connectedness of content and language, various institutional, pedagogical and personal aspects of integration also need to be considered.

Rumlich, D. (2016). Evaluating bilingual education in Germany: CLIL students’ general English proficiency, EFL self-concept and interest. Frankfurt am Main: Lang.

  • The author uses a detailed theoretical account rooted in TEFL, language acquisition and educational psychology to provide a sound basis for the development of a comprehensive model of language learning in CLIL. It incorporates prior knowledge, EFL self-concept, interest in EFL classes, verbal cognitive abilities and contact to English. This model is used to estimate the effects of CLIL in the context of high-intensity programs at German Gymnasien. The statistical evaluation of the quasi-experimental data from 1,000 learners proves the existence of large initial differences due to selection, preparation and class composition effects. After two years, one finds no significant effects of CLIL apart from a minor increase in self-concept, suggesting that the actual effects of CLIL have often been overestimated.